Tag Archives: Internet

#66 – Hope and Chaos: 2017 Unpacked

pexels-photo-372038 Cropped
[Problem with the web audio player? Click here for the full range of listening options]

In this edition of The Aidan Project, Aidan is joined by cultural anthropologist, Jared Miracle, to review 2017. Taking a thematic approach, Aidan and Jared look at the stories which they believe will retain importance in the coming years. This is not a mere countdown show, but a considered appraisal of what 2017 will come to represent in the future. What will 2017 be remembered for in political circles? What issue of protest or division in 2017 will dominate the history books? And, amongst several stories which are perhaps not conducive to generating a smug sense of satisfaction about human progress, what was the most heartwarming moment of 2017? The year has not lacked in hatred, but what can it offer in hope?

Aidan and Jared have both chosen an option from the following themes:

The Biggest Story
Politics and International Relations
Protest and Division
Science, Technology and the Environment
Popular Culture
Heartwarming

To all listeners of the podcast, thank you so much for listening this year – have a wonderful 2018.

If you would like to support the podcast, you can do so here.

References, useful links and further reading:

[In order of episode reference]

For more information on Jared, please visit his web site at http://www.jaredmiracle.com or his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/jaredmiraclewriter. Jared has also started guest-hosting for the New Books in Anthropology Podcast – see http://newbooksnetwork.com/category/anthropology/ for download links.

All False statements involving Donald Trump, PolitiFact, 2017.

For North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, 2017 has been a very good year, Washington Post, 24 December 2017.

Evergreen State College reopens after violent threat and property damage on campus, Washington Post, 5 June 2017.

Don’t shield students from opinions they don’t agree with, universities minister Jo Johnson warns, The Telegraph, 26 December 2017.

After Weinstein: 47 Men Accused of Sexual Misconduct and Their Fall From Power, New York Times, 22 December 2017.

Posthumous wedding for police officer killed in ​Champs-Élysées attack, The Guardian, 31 May 2017.

Related tweets:

Advertisements

#63 – Tribalism Aboard the Ship of Theseus

pexels-photo-89095
[Problem with the web audio player? Click here for the full range of listening options]

In this edition of The Aidan Project, Aidan welcomes back philosopher, Dr. Benedict Beckeld, for a conversation which explores the current political climate, and delves into intriguing questions regarding the self and personal agency. Why has the political climate become so polarised? What is causing this failure of communication? And how do we understand our own personal self – is the self an illusion and do we have the ability to have acted differently in a given situation? Could letting go of an illusory idea of ourselves liberate us to better live, love and learn? Aidan and Benedict discuss tribalism, free speech, political discourse, journalism, truth, relativism, and the deep questions of the self and free will. Aidan and Benedict also both share an example of an unwitting experience in less than honourable journalism – in Benedict’s case, his comments on inner and outer beauty were used in an egregiously misrepresentative manner by an American tabloid newspaper. The episode begins with a summary of the theme from Aidan and Benedict’s previous conversation, episode 12, Western Downfall: Why Trump Won. Benedict explains whether he feels the conditions which led to Donald Trump’s presidency have begun to change or have continued unabated. Dr. Beckeld was born in Sweden to Brazilian and Jewish parents, but emigrated with his family to New York City as a teenager. Dr. Beckeld’s philosophy has thus far focused primarily on matters of aesthetics, ethics, contemporary culture, political philosophy and the philosophy of history. For more information on Dr. Beckeld, you can find him online at http://www.benedictbeckeld.com and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/benedictbeckeld

Links to items discussed on this show:

Benedict Beckeld web site
Benedict Beckeld on YouTube
Benedict Beckeld, Monism and Inner Beauty, 1 June 2017.
Western Downfall: Why Trump Won

#61 – Best of the Project, Vol 2: Donald Trump

pexels-photo-462365
[Problem with the web audio player? Click here for the full range of listening options]

The Aidan Project remains intact after a year of podcasting  – thank you so very much for your support. During 12 months of covering the sublime and, in light of a great deal of madness, no shortage of the ridiculous, it is time to look back and reflect at what has been happening. The theme of this compilation is the remarkable anointing and presidency of Donald Trump. In a tour de force of audio, Aidan presents highlights from episodes which have addressed Trump’s ascendancy and rule. With contributions from a range of guests over the past 12 months, in addition to highlights from a number of Aidan’s solo, ‘Notes on…’ episodes, this ‘best of’ presents discussions on the controversy, intrigue and leadership of the inimitable 45th president of the United States of America. Featured in this edition include political philosopher, Benedict Beckeld, who outlines his theory as to why Trump won the election; malware guru, Ran Levi, who explains the allegations pertaining to Russian meddling during the election cycle; Richard Keeble, Chairman of the Orwell Society, who gives his verdict on “alternative facts”; veteran journalist, Gary Herman, who outlines the challenges of a seemingly post-truth world, and documentary filmmaker, Christopher Hale, who explicates Trump’s disturbing lack of understanding of history. All this and a great deal more in a bumper compilation episode.

Episodes featured in this collection:

#2 – The Man of the Year and The Führer
#10 – George Orwell Versus Alternative Facts
#12 – Western Downfall: Why Trump Won
#16 – On Liberty and Free Speech
#17 – The Fake News Agenda
#38 – Notes on Making America Great Again
#40 – Downloading a President
#41 – Westminster Briefing
#44 – The New Cold War
#46 – The Emergency: Empire, Massacre, Duterte
#47 – Notes on North Korea
#56 – Notes on Patriotism: Taking a Knee
#59 – Notes on Terror, Treason and Anarchy

External audio:

Richard Dawkins interview, Russia Today, June 2017

Related articles:

Donald Trump: Man of Letters
The Berlin Wall and Donald Trump

#58 – Notes on Shame and the Modern Pillory

pexels-photo-247780

[Problem with the web audio player? Click here for the full range of listening options]

Shaming is a form of social control. When a person violates the established norms of their community, the group may respond by condemning, avoiding and ostracizing the ‘guilty’ person. In this edition of the Aidan Project, Aidan examines public shaming in 18C London – where the guilty were placed in the pillory and pelted with various objects, including dead cats – and compares this to social media shaming. Is the treatment meted out on Twitter in 2017 little better than a 1717 stint in the pillory? Why do people join in to attack people they barely know or, more importantly, why do people attack others for ‘offences’ that are often spurious, subjective or not even understood? Aidan looks at one of the most famous cases of social media shaming, the only positive aspect of which was that no dead cats were hurled at the offender. The inherent danger in assisting with frantic social media shaming is that of potentially trivialising something real or exaggerating something trivial. There are, of course, many reasons to be genuinely outraged; Aidan is arguing that by rising up to engage in purely-reactionary shaming, the sphere of honest public discourse is suffering as a result.

Bibliography [by appearance]

Robert Shoemaker, The London Mob: Violence and Disorder in Eighteenth-Century England, (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2004).

‘The price of public shaming in the Internet age’, CNN web site, 16 April 2015, http://www.edition.cnn.com/2015/04/16/living/feat-public-shaming-ronson/index.html

‘A Terrible Shame. Enforcing moral norms without the law is no way to create a virtuous society’, Slate web site, 9 April 2015, http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/view_from_chicago/2015/04/internet_shaming_the_legal_history_of_shame_and_its_costs_and_benefits.html

‘How One Stupid Tweet Blew Up Justine Sacco’s Life’, New York Times web site, 12 February 2015, https://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/15/magazine/how-one-stupid-tweet-ruined-justine-saccos-life.html